20 common jobs where the paycheck keeps getting smaller every year

An employee works in a bakery.

  • The US economy is always changing as new businesses grow and
    others decline.
  • Using Census data, we found 20 industries where workers’
    incomes have fallen dramatically in the last few decades.
  • Chiropractors used to be very well paid back in the day. Not so
    much now.
  • Visit Business
    Insider’s homepage for more stories
    .

The US economy is always changing as new businesses grow and
others decline.

We found 20 industries where workers’ incomes have fallen
dramatically in the last few decades.

Using data from the 1990 Census and the 2017 American Community
Survey assembled by the Minnesota Population Center’s
Integrated Public Use Microdata Series
project, we looked at
what industries had the biggest percent drops in average
self-reported income among workers in those industries between then
and now. Average incomes in 1990 were adjusted for inflation into
2017 dollars
.

While most of the industries tracked by the Census Bureau saw
average wages go up over that period, several had steep declines.
Here are the 20 industry groups with the biggest percent drop in
average incomes between 1990 and 2017:

20. Scrap and waste materials wholesale trade: In 1990, workers
earned an inflation-adjusted average of $48,912, which fell to
$45,527 in 2017, a 7% decline.

What the industry does: Buy and sell scrap
material and waste for disposal or reuse.

19. Blast furnaces, steelworks, rolling, and finishing mills: In
1990, workers earned an inflation-adjusted average of $64,081,
which fell to $59,569 in 2017, a 7% decline.

What the industry does: Manufactures steel and
other iron products.

18. Ordnance manufacturing: In 1990, workers earned an
inflation-adjusted average of $59,729, which fell to $55,729 in
2017, an 8% decline.

What the industry does: Manufactures weapons
and ammunition.

17. Motor vehicle and motor vehicle equipment manufacturing: In
1990, workers earned an inflation-adjusted average of $64,178,
which fell to $59,074 in 2017, an 8% decline.

What the industry does: Builds motor vehicles
and motor vehicle parts.

16. Miscellaneous wholesale trade: In 1990, workers earned an
inflation-adjusted average of $64,658, which fell to $59,398 in
2017, an 8% decline.

What the industry does: This is a catchall
category for businesses in wholesale trade of goods or services not
included in another industry grouping.

15. Tire and inner tube manufacturing: In 1990, workers earned an
inflation-adjusted average of $65,528, which fell to $59,911 in
2017, a 9% decline.

What the industry does: Builds tires and
similar goods.

14. Museums, art galleries, and zoos: In 1990, workers earned an
inflation-adjusted average of $41,882, which fell to $38,159 in
2017, a 9% decline.

What the industry does: Provides educational
and recreational services to patrons.

13. Funeral services and crematories: In 1990, workers earned an
inflation-adjusted average of $56,002, which fell to $50,302 in
2017, a 10% decline.

What the industry does: Facilitate funeral and
cremation services.

12. Retail bakeries: In 1990, workers earned an inflation-adjusted
average of $30,154, which fell to $27,072 in 2017, a 10% decline.

What the industry does: Makes and sells baked
goods to customers.

11. US Postal Service: In 1990, workers earned an
inflation-adjusted average of $59,215, which fell to $53,070 in
2017, a 10% decline.

What the industry does: Transport and deliver
letters, packages, and mail across the US.

10. Bakers: In 1990, workers earned an inflation-adjusted average
of $45,899, which fell to $40,348 in 2017, a 12% decline.

What the industry does: Manufactures bread and
other baked goods to be sold in stores.

9. Plastics, synthetics, and resins manufacturing: In 1990, workers
earned an inflation-adjusted average of $59,558, which fell to
$51,881 in 2017, a 13% decline.

What the industry does: Manufactures plastics
and other goods.

8. Miscellaneous general merchandise stores: In 1990, workers
earned an inflation-adjusted average of $31,312, which fell to
$27,273 in 2017, a 13% decline.

What the industry does: Catchall category for
retail stores not included in some other industry grouping.

7. Warehousing and storage: In 1990, workers earned an
inflation-adjusted average of $40,850, which fell to $34,193 in
2017, a 16% decline.

What the industry does: Stores goods for
businesses or consumers.

6. Miscellaneous professional and related services: In 1990,
workers earned an inflation-adjusted average of $62,980, which fell
to $51,091 in 2017, a 19% decline.

What the industry does: Catchall category for
business and personal services not included in some other industry
category.

5. Barber shops: In 1990, workers earned an inflation-adjusted
average of $34,864, which fell to $27,932 in 2017, a 20% decline.

What the industry does: Cuts hair and provides
related grooming services for clients.

4. Lodging places, except hotels and motels: In 1990, workers
earned an inflation-adjusted average of $34,190, which fell to
$27,147 in 2017, a 21% decline.

What the industry does: Provides residential
space to tenants.

3. Miscellaneous food manufacturing: In 1990, workers earned an
inflation-adjusted average of $55,692, which fell to $43,206 in
2017, a 22% decline.

What the industry does: Catchall category for
food product manufacturing not included in some other industrial
group.

2. Miscellaneous metal production industries: In 1990, workers
earned an inflation-adjusted average of $54,530, which fell to
$38,051 in 2017, a 30% decline.

What the industry does: Catchall category for
metalworking and metal production businesses not included in
another industry group.

1. Chiropractor offices and clinics: In 1990, workers earned an
inflation-adjusted average of $80,721, which fell to $53,027 in
2017, a 34% decline.

What the industry does: Treat ailments of
patients’ spines and backs.

Source: FS – All – Economy – News
20 common jobs where the paycheck keeps getting smaller every year